Signals and Cellular Responses

 

Cell signals travel through the body, coming in contact with many cell types. In this interactive module, you will learn how the response depends on the type of cell the signal reaches.

http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/cells/signals/

For more interactive resources from the Genetic Science Learning Centre (University of Utah Health Sciences), please visit their website: learn.genetics.utah.edu

(Click on the image to go to the resource. Right click on the image to save it to include in your teaching materials. Scan in the QR code to save the resource link on your mobile device.)

 

Flipping cell biology on its head

 

This Cell Biology Flipped Classroom Course was developed by Professor Jonathan Scholey and iBiology. Here you will find all of the course materials including the iBioSeminars (high quality video lectures), discussion questions, and assignments.

http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/taking-courses/cell-biology-flipped-course.html

For more resources from iBiology, please visit their website: http://www.ibiology.org/

(Click on the image to go to the resource. Right click on the image to save it to include in your teaching materials. Scan in the QR code to save the resource link on your mobile device.)

 

Centrioles, lysosomes, microvilli & Co.

 

Learn about centrioles, lysosomes, microvilli and other parts of the animal cell in this interactive module.

https://www.wisc-online.com/LearningContent/ap11403/index.html

(Content author: Dr. Gerald Heins; Content Developer: Tim Gremore)

For more resources from Wisc-Online, please visit their website:

https://www.wisc-online.com/learn/natural-science/life-science/ap11403/a-typical-animal-cell

(Click on the image to go to the resource. Right click on the image to save it to include in your teaching materials. Scan in the QR code to save the resource link on your mobile device.)

 

Apoptosis & Signal Transduction

 

This 3D-animation, created by Drew Berry, explores the Fas signal transduction pathway that induces apoptosis (programmed cell death).

https://www.youtube.com/v/DR80Huxp4y8?version=3

For more resources from The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, please visit their website at:

http://www.wehi.edu.au/education/wehitv/apoptosis_and_signal_transduction/

(Click on the image to go to the resource. Right click on the image to save it to include in your teaching materials. Scan in the QR code to save the resource link on your mobile device.)

Clathrin cages & endocytosis

(This one’s for you, Pranav… Thanks for the tip! – Anne) 

This 3D-animation focuses on the role of clathrin cage assembly and disassembly during endocytosis.

http://player.vimeo.com/video/63913620?title=0&byline=0&portrait=0

This animation was created by Janet Iwasa (University of Utah) in collaboration with Tomas Kirchhausen (Harvard Medical School).

For more animations and resources from Janet Iwasa, please visit her website at: http://onemicron.com/

Clathrin cages & endocytosis

(Click on the image to go to the resource. Right click on the image to save it to include in your teaching materials. Scan in the QR code to save the resource link on your mobile device.)

How bacteria help us put food on the table

 

Learn how a few species of bacteria, called nitrogen-fixers, convert nitrogen gas into a form of nitrogen that other organisms, like plants, can use to make proteins and DNA.

http://bcs.whfreeman.com/thelifewire9e/default.asp#542578__640280__

This resource comes from the Companion Website for the 9th Edition of “Life: The Science of Biology”. For other similar resources, please visit their website: http://bcs.whfreeman.com/thelifewire9e/default.asp#t_542578____

(Click on the image to go to the resource. Right click on the image to save it to include in your teaching materials. Scan in the QR code to save the resource link on your mobile device.)

What sea urchins have taught us about cell division & development

 

In this video, researcher Prof. Fred Wilt explains how much we have learned about cell division and development, by studying the sea urchin.

http://www.exploratorium.edu/imaging-station/gal_media/story_assets/urchin_voiceover/urchin_voiceover.swf

For more resources from the Microscope Imaging Station, please visit the Exploratorium website at:

http://www.exploratorium.edu/imaging-station/research/urchin/story_urchin1.php.

(Click on the image to go to the resource. Right click on the image to save it to include in your teaching materials. Scan in the QR code to save the resource link on your mobile device.)

Understanding the biology of cancer

 

This 11-minute video-animation describes the biological processes that are involved in the development, growth and spread of cancer.

http://www.cancerquest.org/images/FLV/fullDocumentary/English/fullDocInterfaceEng.swf

For more interactive resources from CancerQuest, please visit their website at: http://www.cancerquest.org/.

(Click on the image to go to the resource. Right click on the image to save it to include in your teaching materials. Scan in the QR code to save the resource link on your mobile device.)

Stem cells & the many roles they play

 

In this interactive module, you will discover the important roles stem cells play in our bodies, from embryonic development through adulthood.

http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/stemcells/scintro/Nature_of_Stem_Cells.swf

For more stem cell resources, please visit the Genetic Science Learning Centre (University of Utah Health Sciences) website: http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/stemcells/

(Click on the image to go to the resource. Right click on the image to save it to include in your teaching materials. Scan in the QR code to save the resource link on your mobile device.)

Antigen presentation and cytotoxic T lymphocytes

 

This narrated animation from the HHMI shows how a cell infected by a virus signals cytotoxic T lymphocytes to kill the cell before the virus replicates and spreads.

http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/antigen-presentation-and-ctl

To view more resources from HHMI’s BioInteractive website, please visit: http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive

(Click on the image to go to the resource. Right click on the image to save it to include in your teaching materials. Scan in the QR code to save the resource link on your mobile device.)